Hearing in submarine murder case attracts press and tourists from all over the world

On Tuesday, Danish inventor, Peter Madsen had a preliminary hearing at Copenhagen City Court to determine whether or not he would remain in police custody. The hearing drew a large crowd of international press and onlookers. In Denmark coverage of the case continues to be debated.

Prosecutor Jakob Buch-Jepsen was happy with the court’s decision to keep Madsen in custody. Photo: Lucy Samson

Prosecutor Jakob Buch-Jepsen was happy with the court’s decision to keep Madsen in custody. Photo: Lucy Samson

 

By Lucy Samson & Rasmus Jungersen

An international audience has been captivated by the bizarre circumstances surrounding the death of Swedish Journalist Kim Wall. On Tuesday Press and tourists gathered outside Copenhagen City Court to hear the outcome of Peter Madsen’s preliminary hearing, some with the hope of catching a glimpse of the man accused of murder.

A couple from Australia, a mother and daughter from Germany and a woman from the Czech Republic were only a few of the many who stopped to observe what was going on. Captivated by the bizarre details which have emerged in the media so far, many had their own theories about what may have taken place aboard the submarine.

“It had to be something sexual”, according to the German mother.

Who did it?

Kim Wall boarded the submarine on the 10th of August. Wall was later reported missing and her torso was discovered weighed down with chains and metal rods 11 days later.

The early developments in the submarine murder case. Infographic: Rasmus Jungersen & Lucy Samson

The early developments in the submarine murder case. Infographic: Rasmus Jungersen & Lucy Samson

In court, Peter Madsen explained that Wall died when the hatch of the submarine hit her on the head. He went on to explain that he did indeed dump her body at sea but that it was still intact when he did so.

Having heard both the details released in the media and Madsen’s own account of events many of the crowd had condemned him already:

“They found the body, without the head, without legs, and he says no I didn’t do that, but then who did?” asks Sarah Christine Nørgaard, a photographer from Danish photography agency, Scanpix.

“Everybody I’ve been talking to has been saying it’s gonna be a movie next year” said the young photographer.

Youths straining to see Prosecutor, Jakob Buch-Jepsen giving a statement to the media. Photo: Lucy Samson

Youths straining to see Prosecutor, Jakob Buch-Jepsen giving a statement to the media. Photo: Lucy Samson

Debate over Danish media coverage

In Denmark there has been a debate in the media of whether or not this case has had too much coverage in the media. One seasoned reporter from DR, Denmark’s biggest broadcaster, told her cameraman that she’d never before seen so many members of the press gathered for a preliminary hearing.

On Tuesday, director and author Katrine Wiedemann wrote an opinion piece in Danish newspaper Information scolding the Danish press for their coverage of the events surrounding Kim Walls’ death:

“It’s as if there is a thinly veiled pride in the fact that little peaceful Denmark is able to deliver a setup that is both archetypal, technologically advanced (a submarine!) and original, and that it then makes the round of the entire world press: New York Times, CNN, Guardian!” Wiedemann writes.

On Tuesday the story once again made it to the international press. In particular, Madsen’s explanation of Kim Wall’s death drew many headlines.

The court’s decision

The court decided that Madsen should remain in custody until the 5th of October. It was felt that there had been no reasonable explanation provided by Madsen as to why the body of Kim Wall would end up in the water.

Madsen will also undergo a mental examination by order of the court.