Innovative changes improve the life of residents

The laughter of kids and chatty people gather on a sunny Sunday at Tåsinge Square in Copenhagen. Different tables are placed on one of the paths next to the square with little toys, clothes, and books to sell. Families sit on the grass while other people sip some drinks by a wooden platform, where a woman shouts that this is her favorite place.

In January of 2015, the news website Aljazeera published an article stating that St. Kjeld, a working-class neighborhood of Copenhagen, would become the first climate change adapted neighborhood when authorities, in an attempt to develop strategies to keep floods from happening, decided to turn areas of dull asphalt into green spaces for the community in a project won by the architect firm Tredje Natur in 201

 

St. Kjeld square, Sunday Sept. 11, 2017. Denmark, Copenhagen.

 

Tasinger square went under transformation about three years ago and is equipped with special drainers and green architecture designed to catch rain water to keep it from going into the streets causing floods.

Drain at St. Kjeld square, Sunday Sept. 11, 2017. Denmark, Copenhagen.

 

“There was not much going on here,” says Niels Menair, whose girlfriend’s lived in the neighborhood for years. “ (Tasinger square) suddenly brought life to the area. Now I prefer to come here rather than the harbor.”

Another visualization of the new climatized neighborhood in the article involved the main square, which does not seem to show changes:

 

Source: Tredje Natur

 

St. Kjeld square, Sunday Sept. 11, 2017. Denmark, Copenhagen.